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20 Best Brands to follow on Twitter in 2024

Whether you are a fan of Twitter or not, it is undeniable that this platform powerhouse is brilliant for engaging with consumers at a conversational level.

Founded in 2006, Twitter has over 390 million users as of 2022. The site is a conversation-style forum which encourages users to engage and comment on threads. Twitter is a complex affair regarding business marketing, but it has proved for brands that get things right, the benefits can be plentiful, with users likely to spend 26% longer viewing ads.

There is also room to get creative and use Twitter as a hub for various forms of content. We think the following companies showcase Twitter usage in 2022 at its finest.

Top Beauty Brands

Beauty on Twitter is a massive market that brands can’t afford to miss out on. In 2021, the word ‘beauty’ was featured in over 31 million posts, a 257% increase in usage in 2020. As well as being able to promote products and share user experiences, beauty brands have the option to engage with consumers on a conversational level on Twitter. This is important as with so many products on sale; consumers often need support in choosing what is right for them. Want to know who is acing the beauty Twitter game? Keep reading.

Colour Pop Cosmetics

Colour Pop Cosmetics

ColourPop Cosmetics seems to get social media across all platforms, with their Twitter feed no exception. The brand is marketed towards a younger audience which the content is perfectly reflective of in the form of memes, competitions, and trendy make-up looks.

They also do not use hashtags but have strong calls to action throughout their posts to encourage people to follow them and stay up to date. This is a great method to adopt for younger demographics as they may not be as likely to follow a hashtag, instead searching for the type of content that they want directly.

Finally, they have a perfect tone of voice that continues through posts to replies within comments. ColourPop has ensured that its Twitter feed comes across as one friend talking to another, which is what the platform is brilliant for achieving.

Too Faced Cosmetics

Too Faced Cosmetics

Too Faced Cosmetics has made our list as they have managed to create a brilliant and immersive international community on Twitter. This global brand has unique products that are also marketed as cruelty-free, a popular unique selling point within the beauty industry.

From the first read of their bio to the use of hashtags and emojis throughout, it is obvious to see what the company stands for. This is super important to achieve on Twitter as users are intended to scroll through rapidly as an asset accompanies not all posts.

Most of their posts feature images, but it’s good to see that they have a mix of word threads to mix up the content. Finally, their use of quality product images perfectly matches their broader company branding, meaning that if anyone came across a post, they would instantly know who the brand was.

e.l.f Cosmetics

e.l.f Cosmetics

e.l.f Cosmetics, otherwise known as eyes, lips, face, is a budget-friendly brand that has been a popular choice within the influencer communities for years.

They have made our list as they get everyday conversational tweeting just right. Whilst it is tempting for brands to promote products within every post, e.l.f proves that a mix of content can work perfectly for Twitter engagement.

Their short captions feature affirmations, questions, polls, and generation beauty questions designed to get followers talking. 37% of 18–29-year-olds use the platform, which aligns with the brand’s target audience. Therefore, they clearly understand who their customers are by jumping on hashtags to do with other interests such as popular culture and pets.

As other social media platforms, such as Instagram and TikTok are favoured for video and image content, it’s great to see that e.l.f don’t just repurpose the same content and instead, tailor their Twitter content to those unique users.

Palmers

Palmers

Palmers is a body and hair care brand with a large customer base due to being founded back in the 1970s. They prove how an optimised bio can be achieved using partner company Linktree to provide straightforward customer journeys for their extensive client base. They have a well-planned call to action for their Twitter audience with links to their charitable connections, products, and other social media platforms.

The Twitter algorithm relies on keywords within posts and hashtags that Palmers get just right.

Their content is also nicely varied, with infographics, lifestyle photos, videos, gifs, and user-generated content used to share their brand message.

Foreo

Foreo

The last of our beauty picks is Foreo, a Swedish company that specialises in skin care products and tools. Having achieved their consumer popularity using high-profile influencer deals, their Twitter feed is a refreshing step away from their other feeds, which are largely filled with user-generated content.

Foreo instead chooses to share product insights in an authentic way which suits Twitter’s use as a news source by at least 69% of people. This is further enhanced by the blogs and extended threads that they promote and share on their feed.

Top Food & Drink Brands

Twitter is an excellent platform for food and drinks companies to leverage the reactive consumer. A brand can create engaged communities by posting at keys and offering themselves as a solution to upcoming needs. Check out our selection of companies who leave the consumer wanting another bite!

Skittles

Skittles

Who better to start with than the winners of the ‘Best of Tweets Brand Bracket’ 2022, Skittles.

This fun feed took the prize after showcasing a brilliant use of community building using the hashtag #RallyForTheRainbow. From the moment you read their bio, look at their funny tweets, and see the spirit of their followers within the comments, you realise that Skittles offers followers a fun form of escapism from their daily lives.

Their witty one-liners and memes are designed perfectly as sharable content. The brand is a household name for many, so directly selling products is not their goal. Instead, they have been able to add a modern image to this older brand that keeps their brand name fresh in the minds of many different generations of consumers.

Oreo

Oreo

Oreo’s are popular products worldwide that offer different products in different markets, making their social promotions a bit more complex.

Cleverly, they use their products to jump onto reactive trends that are common themes on many other social networks. From their promotion of pumpkin-spiced products aimed at those who love autumn more than summer to their party cheesecake recipes, they produce the perfectly desired content.

Oreo also creatively use threads to post competitions such as word searches and crosswords, which is a brilliant way of increasing engagement. We like to see innovative new ways to use social platforms, and Oreo really stands out for how they have modernised Twitter.

Yo! Sushi

Yo! Sushi

Yo! Sushi’s delectable feed is enough to make you hungry, even if you have only just eaten!

The signature bright colours and quality images grab the attention of people scrolling through their Twitter feeds. They also ensure their posts stay current, with nods to TV shows and events that their target audience is likely to be interacting with.

They also cleverly only use video content when promoting a new product or as a re-share of user-generated material. This means that followers, who are interested in those forms of content, instantly have an idea as to what the content will be about.

High-profile brand collaborations, including Disney and Little Moons, are also promoted, improving their cross-profile engagement levels.

Smart Water

Smart Water

Smart Water is an example of a brand that keeps things simple, and it really works. Their short bio is a fun take on what their product would be used for in other contexts.

All assets feature the signature clean white backgrounds with blue accents and put the product at the centre of any content. The tone of voice is simple and light-hearted to appeal to as many people as possible.

Most of their content is video-based, a popular way of engaging users. These posts do work well as they have the highest levels of engagement throughout their feed.

The reactive content they choose to align with also represents their position as a more expensive water brand. Content themes such as sharing images from the annual MET gala to professional product shots with celebrity models all enhance the brand’s message without needing to use hashtags or long lines of copy.

McDonald’s

McDonald's

Our final food and drink brand is McDonald’s, which gets conversational posts just right!

Their signature red and yellow header banner and the fun tagline are the perfect way to unlock memories for many users who would have grown up with the brand being a staple. Their posts are also simple one-liners, which play on both Mcdonald’s representation within popular culture and reactive themes across other social media channels.

Interestingly, they also share posts that people give them negative feedback to align with customers on the same level. With 94% of consumers preferring transparent brands, Mcdonald’s is using their mistakes to their advantage to resonate with consumers and admit when they are wrong.

Top Clothing Brands

With 16% of users on the site admitting they visit Twitter to find new brands, having an established presence on the site is important for clothing companies. Fast fashion and a reduction in disposable income for many are just two trends that have impacted the type of content that is successful on Twitter. We think these brands use the platform well to promote products while sharing information about what their company stands for.

Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs

With 8.5 million followers, Marc Jacobs has a huge Twitter following and for a very good reason.

Concise tweets always perform best, with posts with 100 characters or less being best received by consumers. Marc Jacobs use their captions in a succinct way that is reminiscent of a magazine photo caption in the likes of Vogue. The structure of their captions is also unique, giving a sense of exclusivity to their